Last edited by Tolmaran
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Explosibility of gases from mine fires found in the catalog.

Explosibility of gases from mine fires

G. A. Burrell

Explosibility of gases from mine fires

by G. A. Burrell

  • 310 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mine explosions,
  • Mine fires

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby George A. Burrell and George G. Oberfell.
    Series[United States] Bureau of mines. Technical paper,, 134
    ContributionsOberfell, George G., joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTN1 .U6 no. 134
    The Physical Object
    Pagination31 p. incl. plan.
    Number of Pages31
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6592835M
    LC Control Number16026094
    OCLC/WorldCa14120854

    Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities NFPA 61 protects lives and property from fires and dust explosions in facilities handling, processing, or storing bulk agricultural materials, their by-products, or other agricultural related dusts and materials. MINE FIRES 90 5) Explosions: Fire damp and coal dust explosions leave in their wake smouldering and active Fires.. The explosion flame, gases and coal dust take part in an explosion may set on fire on wooden doors, non fire proof pieces of clothing, un burnt coal dust and loose coal an ultimately to coal faces. 6) Miscellaneous.

    coal dust and flammable gas, the critical minimum ignition energy is that which affects the gas. When ignited, the gas releases sufficient energy to suspend and ignite a coal dust cloud. Oxygen As the volatile content of a coal increases, less oxygen is required to complete the fire . The gas mixture from a leakage will not be homogeneous and lighter gases concentrates along the ceiling. Heavy gases concentrates along the floor. Ventilation, natural or mechanical, must be sufficient to limit the concentration of flammable gases or vapors to a maximum level of 25% of their "Lower Explosive or Flammable Limit" (LEL/LFL).

    In , U.S. municipal fire departments responded to an estimated average of 51, fires per year starting with ignition of a flammable gas and another , fires per year starting with ignition of a flammable or combustible liquid. The flammable gas fires resulted in an estimated civilian deaths, 1, civilian injuries, and $ million in direct property damage per year. Fire gases include carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and acrolein. (See box below for the effects of several typical fire gases.) Flame is the luminous portion of burning gases or vapors. Smoke is the airborne particulate products of incomplete combustion, suspended in gases, vapors, or solid or liquid aerosols.


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Explosibility of gases from mine fires by G. A. Burrell Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book provides a systematic view on flammability and a collection of solved engineering problems in the fields of dilution and purge, mine gas safety, technology dilution explosibility flammability flammability diagrams gas suppression theory ignitability liquid and gas mixture safety mine fires purge.

Authors and affiliations. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Burrell, G.A. (George Arthur), b. Explosibility of gases from mine fires. Washington, Govt. Print. The book provides a systematic view on flammability and a collection of solved engineering problems in the fields of dilution and purge, mine gas safety, clean burning safety and gas suppression modeling.

For the first time, fundamental principles of energy conservation are used to develop. A dangerous mine atmosphere is one that is or is likely to become poisonous to breathe, deficient in oxygen, or explosive. Q: What is the specific gravity of normal air. A: Q: Write down the chemical symbols of Methane and Hydrogen Sulfide.

A: CH 4 and H 2 S Q: Name the common gases found in coal mines following a mine fire or explosion. Gas explosions or mine fires present the safety threats for coal miners or mine rescues members.

For an explosive atmosphere in the underground mine, careful determination of its explosibility. Gases can also be maintained safely at concentrations above the UEL, although a breach in the storage container can lead to explosive conditions or intense fires.

Dusts [ edit ] Dusts also have upper and lower explosion limits, though the upper limits are hard to measure and of little practical importance. In summary, in coal mine fires or explosions, acetylene (C 2 H 2), ethylene (C 2 H 4) and ethane (C 2 H 6) are often found in the underground air.

Although the total amount of these gases is not large, they are significant to affect the explosibility of the mine gas mixture. The characteristic points for the added combustible gases are listed.

Coal mine explosions initially start with the ignition of the underground combustible gases. According to historical mine disaster statistics, a majority of these explosions have started from or around the sealed areas (Cheng & Luo, ).Technically speaking, a sealed atmosphere in a mine-out area of an underground coal mine is simply a volume governed by boundary conditions (Zipf &.

contribute to both explosibility and the toxicity of the atmosphere Fighting mine fires using gases with particular reference to nitrogen by S.K.

Ray*, A. Zutshi*, B.C. Bhowmick*, N. Sahay*, and R.P. Singh* Synopsis The practice of pumping gases which inhibit combustion for purposes of controlling or extinguishing mine fires is now universally. important to mine safety, such as the explosibility of gas mixtures.

The second chapter covers methane sampling, which is crucial because many methane explosions have been attributed to sampling deficiencies. Subsequent chapters describe methane control methods for.

The detection of gas or smoke is the most cost-effective approach to providing fire detection coverage over a large area or throughout the entire mine (Morrow and Litton ).

Thermal fire detection systems are commonly installed for unattended equipment, such as over conveyor belts. analysis results are then interpreted with respect to relevant fire ratios. Explosibility of gas mixtures can then be determined with the help of Coward’s diagram or USBM explosibility triangle or Ellicott’s extension.

This pa-per is devoted to all the above-mentioned steps while assessing the status of sealed coal mine fire. Recently ob. A dust explosion is the rapid combustion of fine particles suspended in the air within an enclosed location. Dust explosions can occur where any dispersed powdered combustible material is present in high-enough concentrations in the atmosphere or other oxidizing gaseous medium, such as pure cases when fuel plays the role of a combustible material, the explosion is known as a fuel-air.

Subsurface fires and explosions Malcolm J. McPherson 21 - 2 FIRE GASES AND THEIR INTERPRETATION 35 The processes of burning and the gases produced 35 The detection and trend analysis of fire gases 36 Explosibility diagrams 39 EXPLOSIONS 45 Initiation of explosions 45 Get this from a library.

Ignitability and explosibility of gases and vapors. [Tingguang Ma] -- The book provides a systematic view on flammability and a collection of solved engineering problems in the fields of dilution and purge, mine gas safety, clean burning safety and gas suppression.

From Purpose: "The purpose of this paper is to discuss briefly the analysis of complex mixtures of gases encountered in mine fires and to illustrate application of such data in fire-fighting procedures.

This report illustrates how analyses of mine-fire gases can be utilized to determine the progress of mine fires as well as to establish safe tactics for controlling and extinguishing these fires. The Role of Gas Monitoring in the Prevention and Treatment of Mine Fires D.

Brady Department of Mines and Energy, Queensland Follow this and additional works at: Recommended Citation D. Brady, The Role of Gas Monitoring in the Prevention and Treatment of Mine Fires, in Naj Aziz and Bob.

Ignitability and Explosibility of Gases and Vapors - Kindle edition by Ma, Tingguang. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Ignitability and Explosibility of Gases and cturer: Springer.

After a severe coal mine fire or an explosion event, a common practice for minimizing the risk is to seal the related area, and then to inject the inert gas (N2 and/or CO2) into the sealed area to.

It is important that the air returning from the fire area be monitored for explosibility. The main hazard after sealing a mine fire is the possibility of an explosion within the sealed area. all persons to reach the surface before the fire gases were actually moved A reasonable period should be given for the fire gases to be removed and.

Rapid expansion of gases resulting in rapidly moving Explosibility parameters Fires can also result from explosions, and explosions can result from fires. A good example of how the energy release rate affects the consequences of an accident is a standard automobile tire.Ina new laboratory investigation was started to study the causes, behavior, and control of mine fires.

The Bureau began collecting extensive data on the atmospheric composition of gases during mine fires. The Bureau’s gas laboratory is shown in figure 4.The book provides a systematic view on flammability and a collection of solved engineering problems in the fields of dilution and purge, mine gas safety, clean burning safety and gas suppression modeling.

item 7 Ignitability and Explosibility of Gases and Vapors by Tingguang Ma.